Veronica Newton

Research and Teaching: 

Youth in Today’s World, Social Problems, Black Americans and Culture and Mass Media.

Bio: 

Veronica A. Newton is a doctoral candidate in the department of Sociology at the University of Missouri- Columbia. She received her B.A. in Psychology with a Sociology minor from Texas State University in 2009.  She completed a Master of Arts in Public Sociology from Saint Louis University in 2013 and passed her oral exam with Distinction. Veronica is a Gus T. Ridgel Fellow at MU and she also has completed her course work for a Ph.D. minor in Black Studies at MU. Her two area of research are Culture and Identity and Social Inequalities. Her research interests include Sociology of Education, Critical Race Studies, and Black women in higher education. Her teaching interests are: Social Inequalities, Black Sociology, and Education and Culture. Veronica’s dissertation research examines how Black Undergraduate women deal with and manage gendered racism at a historically, predominately white university (HPWI).

Awards and Honors: 

Teaching and Research Award: Department of Sociology, University of Missouri-Columbia 11/2016- $500.00- Funded

Dr. Donald M. Suggs Dissertation Support Fellowship: University of Missouri- Columbia Graduate Studies 8/2015- Funded: $1,500.00.

James S. Rollins Slavery Atonement Endowment from Black Studies Department University of Missouri- Columbia 5/2015 Funded: $500.00.

Select Publications: 

Newton, V and Sandoval, J. S. (2015). “Educational Expectations among Suburban African American Low to Moderate Income Public High School Students.” Journal of African American Studies, 19(2), 135-156.

Newton, V. (2015). Book Review: Racial Formation in the United States. M. Omi and H. Winant (2015), Third Edition. Routledge, New York, NY. Issues in Race & Society: An Interdisciplinary Global Journal, 3(2), 85-87.

Newton, V., Nied, D., Roar, A., Stillwell, D., Matsuo, H. (2014). “Exploring Identity and Interactions of African American and Asian American College Students: Interdisciplinary Approach.” Journal of Education and Human Development, 3(2), 155-179.       

Newton, V., Matsuo, H., Wang, E. & Giovanoni, A. (2014). “Perceived English Competency Among International College Students from China.in ESL/EAP Classrooms.” International Journal of Linguistics and Communication, 2(2), 43-61.

Selected Presentations:

Tafari, D. and Newton, V. Hip-Hop Feminism as a Critical Pedagogy- “They Laugh ‘cause they assume I’m in prison’” American Education Studies Association Conference. Seattle, WA. November 2016. Roundtable

Newton, V. Dissertation: The Role of Marked and Unmarked Spaces at a Historically White University: The Racialized and Gendered Experiences of Black Undergraduate Women”. Association for Black Sociologists Annual Conference. Memphis, TN. October 2016. Formal Paper Session I.

Casper, J. and Newton. V. “Everybody Wants to be Black Until It’s Time to Be Black: The Cultural Appropriation of Black Women.” Association for Black Sociologists Annual Conference. Memphis, TN. October 2016. Formal Paper Session I.

Newton, V. “Centering the experiences of Black women activists at MU: A Critical Race Feminist perspective on student activism”. Critical Race Theory in Education Conference, Denver, CO, June 2016. Panel Session. Panel Discussant.

Newton, V. & Hawkman, A. “CRiT walking through Grad School: a collaborative feminist auto-ethnography on the discourse of race within the classroom.” Midwest Sociological Society, Chicago, IL, March 2016. Panel Session.

Newton, V. A. Hawkman, L. King, T. Hairston, C. Jackson, J. Davis, D. Aguayo, T. Douglas. “Black Masculinity in Education Transformational Spaces of Learning and Healing.” American Educational Studies Association: San Antonio, TX, November 2015. Paper Symposium.

Newton, V. “Examining African American High School Students’ Academic Aspirations: The role of family and guidance counselors.” Association for Black Sociologists Annual Conference. Chicago, IL. August 2015. Formal Paper Session I.

V. Newton, D. Nied, A. Rorer, D. Stillwell, H. Matsuo. “Racial and Social Identity Performance of African American and Asian American Undergraduate Students at a Predominately White Institution: Grounded Theory Method.” Midwest Sociological Society, Kansas City, MO. March 2015. Formal Paper Session I.

Newton, V. “Gender Similarities and Differences of Academic Aspirations Among African American Suburban High School Students.” Midwest Sociological Society, Omaha, NE, April 2014. Formal Paper Session.

V. Newton, D. Nied, A. Rorer, D. Stillwell, H. Matsuo, E. Wang. “Exploring Identity and Interactions of African American and Asian American College Students: Interdisciplinary Approach.” Ethnographic and Qualitative Research Conference, Cedarville University, Cedarville, OH, June 2013. Formal Paper Session.  

V. Newton. Thesis: “Gender Differences the Educational Expectations of African American males and females: Exploring Attitudes, Perceptions and Aspirations” Midwest Sociological Society, Chicago, IL, March 2013. Formal Paper Session.